What is Operation Wallacea?

What is Operation Wallacea?

Operation Wallacea (Opwall) is a conservation research organisation that is funded by, and relies on, teams of student volunteers who join expeditions for the opportunity to work on real-world research programmes alongside academic researchers.

Most science programmes that deliver research outcomes are funded on a short-term basis by grants with typically tightly restricted aims. Long-term projects covering large bio-geographical scales that can incorporate more than one ecosystem are rare. By adopting a volunteer funded model, Opwall does not suffer from those restrictions and can draw upon researchers from a wide range of different disciplines and academic institutions, and create long-term research projects.

Those researchers and academics also separate Opwall from other volunteer organisations, allowing a truly research orientated project. You can also find out more about peoples experiences and our projects at the Opwall Blog.

Features

  • Over 330 Peer Reviewed Publications
  • More than 40 new vertebrate species discovered
  • Supported more than 70 PhDs
  • Involved in the establishment of multiple protected areas
  • Supervised over 1000 undergraduate and masters dissertations
  • Directs $millions every year to on-the-ground conservation and research
  • Alumni includes than 20,000 volunteers from over 100 countries

Research

  • Who is involved with our research?

    Large teams of ecologists, scientists, academics and postgraduate researchers who are specialists in various aspects of biodiversity or social and economic studies are concentrated at the target study sites. This gives volunteers the opportunity to work on a wide range of projects alongside field specialists.

  • Outputs

    The expeditions produce a large number of publications in peer-reviewed journals each year – over 300 so far – almost all of which had data collected by teams of volunteers. It has also led to the discovery of 37 new species that have been formally described. Independent funding enables large temporal and spatial biodiversity and socio-economic datasets to be produced and provide information to help with organising effective conservation management programmes.

  • Independent funding – enabling long-term research

    Most science programmes that deliver research outcomes are funded on a short-term basis by grants with typically tightly restricted aims. Long-term projects covering large bio-geographical scales that can incorporate more than one ecosystem are rare. By adopting a volunteer funded model, Opwall does not suffer from those restrictions and can draw upon researchers from a wide range of different disciplines and academic institutions, and create long-term research projects.

    Those researchers and academics also separate Opwall from other volunteer organisations, allowing a truly research orientated project. You can also find out more about peoples experiences and our projects at the Opwall Blog.

     

Our Publications

  • 0

    Total publications

  • 0

    Average per year

  • 0

    Weeks field research annually

Ways to join an Opwall project

  • OpwallHondurasBenSadd

    Joining for Experience as a Research Assistant

    An Operation Wallacea expedition allows you the chance to participate in active field research. By working with a range of academic teams and scientists you are afforded the opportunity to enhance your career potential, to see if field work is something you wish to pursue and to try something completely different, all while being part of a legacy-leaving project.

    Research Assistant Expeditions
  • peruvicki2

    Joining to Complete a Dissertation / Final Year Project

    You can join an expedition to collect data for your own project, using this towards your degree or in some cases masters theses or even to allow you the opportunity to work in a particular field or study area.

    Dissertation Projects
  • OpwallPeruFabianMulhberger (6)

    Joining as a School Group

    Groups of sixth form/high school students in their last two years before going on to university or college can join Opwall expeditions as long as they are accompanied by a teacher. The school groups are required to collect data for at least part of their expedition which helps with the research objectives and publications for that site. During their 2 week expeditions the school groups also have the opportunity to work alongside a range of different field scientists and learn about the survey techniques and species encountered. At each of the sites a lecture series is run to provide background information about the habitats and species, which are tied into many of the concepts learned in pre-university biology, geography and environmental science courses.

    School Expeditions

Want to know more?

Wallace House, Old Bolingbroke, Spilsby, Lincolnshire PE23 4EX, UK
| +44 (0) 1790 763194 | info@opwall.com