• Overview
  • Objectives
  • Costs to Consider
  • Site Conditions

This expedition is based at the marine research site in Akumal. If you are not already dive trained, you can spend your first week completing a PADI Open Water dive training course, before moving onto the Caribbean reef ecology course in your final week. This course consists of lectures and morning and afternoon in-water practicals and trains you in some of the survey techniques used in the marine environment to assess the status of reefs and their associated fish communities. If you are already dive trained or just wanting to snorkel your first week is on the Caribbean reef ecology course and the second would be spent working with different researchers on-site. Projects you will join include monitoring of sea turtle grazing of seagrasses and seagrass biomass in Akumal Bay and investigation of the carbon biomass, health and function of different mangrove systems, including the unique cenote fed mangroves found only in the Yucatan Peninsula.

Mexico Marine Research Objectives

Akumal is a small coastal town located approximately 2 hours’ drive south from the major tourist destination of Cancun. The name Akumal literally means “home of the turtles” in Mayan. It earned this name due to the numerous turtle nesting sites along the beaches and the permanent presence of juvenile turtles in the seagrasses just off shore. Prior to established tourism in the Yucatan, the only real source of income was from fishing. The reefs were so heavily overfished that the entire ecosystem almost collapsed. Moreover, sea turtles and their eggs were a major food source rather than an attraction to be admired, resulting in a serious decline in the turtle population. In an attempt to save the reef ecosystem and provide alternative income for local people, dive and snorkel based tourism was actively encouraged by the Mexican government. Tourism in the area has steadily increased over the last 20 years, but now it has brought problems of its own. More hotels are being built to accommodate tourists leading to loss of important nesting habitat for turtles, loss of mangrove habitat that cleans water and prevents sediment from washing onto the reef, and too many people snorkelling with turtles.

At the marine site, the research is focussed on assessing the efficacy of the newly formed Akumal marine protected area on the abundance and health of seagrasses and the impact of snorkel tours on the abundance, health and behaviour of sea turtles. The new protected area also provides the opportunity for recovery of the coral reefs, but as natural coral recovery rates are so slow, we are assisting the process by attaching coral fragments to artificial reefs composed of different substrates of varying structural complexity in order to assess the best methods for coral reef restoration in the region. Combined with mapping and monitoring of the existing reefs we are able to determine the positive impact of the new protected area on the coral reef ecosystem. Another aim of the Akumal project is to monitor the impact of mangrove degradation on the adjacent reefs and to investigate the ecology of the unique mangroves surrounding sink holes (cenotes) connected to the underground river system that runs throughout the Yucatan Peninsula.

  • Opwall fee
  • Cost of international flights into and out of Cancun.
  • Cost of internal travel to and from the start and end point of the expedition, plus any hotels you might require. This costs around £177 or $257 on average. Extra nights’ accommodation in Cancun costs around £61 or $88.
  • Dive equipment rental – $75 per week or equivalent in pesos for a full dive kit. If you only wish to snorkel and want to hire snorkel equipment, the cost is $38 per week. Please note that wetsuits/rash vests cannot be provided – you should bring your own.
  • Park entrance fees – £10 or $15
  • PADI manual and PIC card (if you are completing your Open Water qualification) – £69 or $89 approx.
  • Vaccinations and prophylactic medicines – cost can vary depending on your healthcare provider.
  • All prices in GBP or USD unless specified.

Climate
In Mexico it is hot and humid. Temperatures rarely drop below mid 20s even at night. It is unlikely to rain much, but you do get occasional heavy showers during the season.

Fitness level required
Medium in the forest, low on the marine site. There are some reasonably long walks through the forest, terrain varies by camp with some being almost completely flat and others more undulating. On the marine site lower levels of fitness are required (although you will likely be very tired at the end of the day after the in-water sessions).

Creature comforts
Facilities in the forest are basic (sleeping in tents or hammocks in a camp site), with a mixture of dry and trench toilets. There are freshwater showers but water conservation is particularly important to bear in mind. There are some limited opportunities to buy snacks at some forest camps and there is no phone signal at any of the sites. On the marine site the facilities are a little less rustic – you sleep in bunk beds in dormitories about 10 minutes drive from the beach. There is good phone signal and the site is well supplied with shops.

Locations

  • Mexico
  • Akumal

Want to get involved with this project?

Preparation

Want to get involved with this project?

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